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Andrew Carnegie

The Carnegie Institution for Science is a private organization that conducts basic research for the benefit of humanity.

Other News

— PBS Interviews Chris Field at the Peru Climate Talks (at 6:30) more »

Read Newsweek's coverage of Greg Asner's forest mapping work in Peru more »

— Listen to Chris Field's interview about the latest IPCC climate report on CCTV ( at about 2:50) more »

Greg Asner 's gold mining work in Peru is featured in the Economist more »

Anna Michalak explains more about Lake Erie algae problem on PBS News Hour (at 2 min.) more »

— Watch Anna Michalak's interview on PBS News Hour about the algal bloom in Lake Erie causing water problems in Toledo more »

In Memoriam

Jeanette Snyder Brown

 

Recent News

Drought Led to Massive “Dead Zone” in Lake Erie

Lake Erie just can’t catch a break. The lake has experienced harmful algal blooms and severe oxygen-depleted “dead zones” for years, but now a team of researchers led by DGE’s Anna Michalak and Yuntao Zhou has shown that the widespread drought in 2012 was associated with the largest dead zone since at least the mid-1980s. more »

Warming reaches maximum 10 years after carbon dioxide emission

The climate warming caused by a single carbon emission takes only about 10 years to reach its maximum effect. This is important because it refutes the common misconception that today’s emissions won’t be felt for decades and that they are a problem for future generations. For the first time, a study conducted by DGE's Katharine Ricke and Ken Caldeira has evaluated how long it takes to feel the maximum warming effect caused by a single carbon emission. Their work is published in Environmental Research Letters. more »

Overhaul in Tropical Forest Research Needed

New work from a team led by DGE’s Greg Asner shows the limitations of long-used research methods in tropical rainforest ecology and points to new technological approaches for understanding forest structures and systems on large geographic scales. When forests grow, they absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, and store the carbon in plant branches, trunks, roots, and soils. Tropical forests, in particular, store more atmospheric carbon as biomass than any other land ecosystem on Earth. As a result, the importance of large-scale measurements and monitoring of tropical forest structure and biomass has rapidly increased throughout the science, conservation and climate change-policy communities. more »

Mapping reveals targets for preserving tropical carbon stocks

A new high-resolution mapping strategy has revealed billions of tons of carbon in Peruvian forests that can be preserved as part of an effort to sequester carbon stocks in the fight against climate change. Tropical forests convert more carbon from the atmosphere into biomass than any other terrestrial ecosystem on Earth. However, when land is used for agriculture, as a wood source, or for mining, carbon is often released into the atmosphere where it contributes to climate change. Tropical deforestation and forest degradation account for about 10 percent of the world’s carbon emissions annually. more »