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Andrew Carnegie

The Carnegie Institution for Science is a private organization that conducts basic research for the benefit of humanity.

Other News

— PBS Interviews Chris Field at the Peru Climate Talks (at 6:30) more »

Read Newsweek's coverage of Greg Asner's forest mapping work in Peru more »

— Listen to Chris Field's interview about the latest IPCC climate report on CCTV ( at about 2:50) more »

Greg Asner 's gold mining work in Peru is featured in the Economist more »

Anna Michalak explains more about Lake Erie algae problem on PBS News Hour (at 2 min.) more »

— Watch Anna Michalak's interview on PBS News Hour about the algal bloom in Lake Erie causing water problems in Toledo more »

In Memoriam

Jeanette Snyder Brown

 

Recent News

Joe Berry Elected to National Academy of Sciences

Joseph A. Berry, staff scientist at Carnegie’s Department of Global Ecology, has been elected to the National Academy of Sciences, one of 84 new members and 21 foreign associates. Election to the NAS is one of the highest honors given to scientists. Berry has been a staff scientist at Carnegie since 1972. Over the years he has pioneered laboratory and field techniques for understanding the exchange of carbon dioxide and water between plants and the atmosphere. His models and methods are widely used for understanding local, regional, and global matter and energy fluxes, with important applications to crop yields, water resources, and climate change. more »

Whitening the Arctic Ocean: May restore sea ice, but not climate

Some scientists have suggested that global warming could melt frozen ground in the Arctic, releasing vast amounts of the potent greenhouse gas methane into the atmosphere, greatly amplifying global warming. It has been proposed that such disastrous climate effects could be offset by technological approaches, broadly called geoengineering. One geoengineering proposal is to artificially whiten the surface of the Arctic Ocean in order to increase the reflection of the Sun’s energy into space and restore sea ice in the area. New research from Carnegie’s Ivana Cvijanovic (now at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) and Ken Caldeira, as well as Douglas MacMartin of Caltech, shows that while an incredibly large effort could, in principle, restore vast amounts of sea ice by this method, it would not result in substantial cooling. As a result, it would not be effective in keeping the ground frozen in the Arctic. Their findings are published by Environmental Research Letters. more »

Carnegie Launches Next Generation Airborne Laboratory for Earth

Carnegie Science announces the launch of the Carnegie Airborne Observatory-3 (CAO-3), the most scientifically advanced aircraft-based mapping and data analytics system in civil aviation today. “The future of ecosystem research takes off,” remarked principal investigator Greg Asner of Carnegie’s Department of Global Ecology. more »

Glimpses of the future: Drought damage leads to widespread forest death

The 2000-2003 drought in the American southwest triggered a widespread die-off of forests around the region. A DGE-led team of scientists including Carnegie's William Anderegg (now at Princeton University), Joseph Berry, and Christopher Field developed a new modeling tool to explain how and where trembling aspen forests died as a result of this drought. It is based on damage to the individual trees' ability to transport water under water-stressed conditions. more »